CLIMATIC PHENOMENON:

Compilation Of A 20-Year Sea Ice Motion Dataset By Blending Data From Multiple Sources

1999

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/386.htm

 

Initial Results Of A Global Blended Chlorophyll Analysis 1999

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/289.htm

 

Recent Abrupt Changes In Winter Atmospheric Circulation And TheirRelation To Pacific Sea Surface Temperature, Hui Wang, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; and R. Fu 1999

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/1480.htm

 

Multi-Scale Response Of Global Sea Surface Temperature To Solar Activity, Hengyi Weng, SAIC/General Sciences Corp, Greenbelt, MD

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/1584.htm

 

Variability in Sea Ice and the Ocean, American Geophysical Union

http://www.agu.org/revgeophys/schime01/node9.html

 

The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), American Geophysical Union

http://www.agu.org/revgeophys/schime01/node4.html

 

Solar Variability, American Geophysical Union

http://www.agu.org/revgeophys/schime01/node3.html

 

Internally-Generated Variability In Some Ocean Models On Decadal

To Millennial Timescales, Timothy J. Osborn Sept 1995

http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/~timo/phdabs.htm

 

Potential Effects of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases on Avian Habitats and

Populations in the Northern Great Plains , Diane Larson USFWS ND

http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/othrdata/greengas/greengas.htm

 

10th Symposium on Global Change Studies

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/globalchange.htm

 

The Earth’s Climate System

http://ag.arizona.edu/~lmilich/ecs.html

 

Results of a NASA Recon search on selected terms

http://wwwghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/ghcc/HydroSearch/recon1.html

 

World Climate Research Programme – Arctic Sea Ice

http://www.npolar.no/acsys/seaice.htm

 

Hydrological Cycle in the Arctic Region

http://www.npolar.no/acsys/hydrolo.htm

 

Rapid Oscillations (Decades)

http://www.agu.org/revgeophys/schime01/node11.html

 

Inter-Decadal Climate Oscillations Along The Extra-Tropical Western Coasts Of The Americas- Evidence From Tree Rings Over The Past Four Centuries

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/519.htm

 

Orbital Forcing In Paleoclimatic Models

Vladimir L. Potemkin, Limnological Institute, Irkutsk, Russia 1999

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/199.htm

 

Global Ocean Surface Heat Budget And Interbasin-Mass Transport Estimated From Ocean Isopycnal General Circulation Model - Japan 1999

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/1725.htm

 

The Annual Cycle Of The Interannual Variability Of Pacific Sea Surface Temperature

http://www.confex2.com/ams/99annual/abstracts/1390.htm

 

Prevailing anomaly patterns of the global sea surface temperature and tropospheric responses Kung, E.C.; Chern, J.G. Atmosfera 8:99-114. 1995. Reprint: 1001

 

Global sea surface temperatures and associated long-range predictability of the northern hemisphere circulation and local climatological variables Kung, E.C.; Chern, J.G.; Smith, D.E. Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences 6:553-577. 1995. Reprint:1000

 

Sea ice as a factor in seabird distribution and ecology in the Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering seas. Divoky, G.J. Pages 9-17 in J. C. Bartonek and D. N. Nettleship, eds.. Conservation of marine birds of northern North America. U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv. Wildl. Res. Rep. 11. 319 pp 1979. Reprint 0453

ABSTRACT: Arctic sea ice has a variety of effects on seabirds. Although the decrease in surface area available for feeding and roosting is probably the major restrictive effect, also important are productivity of water covered by ice and thereduced prey abundance in nearshore areas due to ice scour. The most important benefit that sea ice provides to seabirds is the plankton bloom that occurs in the ice in the spring. In the Beaufort and Chukchi seas this bloom supports an under-ice fauna that is an important food source for seabirds.

 

Mammals and birds Bartonek, J.C.; Elsner, R.; Fay, F.H. Pages 23-28 in E. J. Kelley and D. W. Hood, eds. Probes: a prospectus on processes and resources of the Bering Sea shelf, 1975-1985. Univ. of AK., Inst. of Marine Sci., Fairbanks. 71 pp. 1974. Reprint: 0189

 

Principal components of global sea surface temperatures and large-scale precipitation patterns in North America Kung, E.C.; Smith, D.E. Pages 201-209 in Proc. of the 5th Internatl. Conf. On Precipitation: Time Variability and Dynamics. World Meteorological Organization. Crete, Greece. 1995. Reprint 0995

 

Principal components of global sea surface temperatures and large-scale precipitation patterns in North America Kung, E.C.; Smith, D.E. Pages 201-209 in Proc. of the 5th Internatl. Conf. On Precipitation: Time Variability and Dynamics. World Meteorological Organization. Crete, Greece. 1995. Reprint: 0995

 

The association of seabirds with the Arctic pack ice off Alaska Divoky, G.J. Page 6 in Proc. lst Annu. Meet. Pacific Seabird Group, Seattle, WA. (Abstr.) 1974. 0186

ABSTRACT: Observations in the Beaufort, Chukchi and Bering Seas have shown that birds are more numerous at the ice edge than in the open water south of the pack. The apparent reason for this distribution is the concentration of organisms found at the ice edge. Plankton blooms in and under the ice support an under-ice fauna that is an important food source for certain Arctic seabirds. While birds are found at the ice edge throughout the year it is probably most important in winter when surface waters in the Arctic are severely depleted of organisms. The Ivory Gull and Slack Guillemot spend much of the year at the Ice edge and arerarely found in pelagic areas away from the ice. Ross' Gull may also depend on the under-ice fauna for much of its food since it apparently winters in high Arctic areas feeding in leads in the ice. Species which utilize the ice edge but are also frequently found away from the ice include the Glaucous Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, Slaty-backed Gull, Black-legged Kittiwake and Common andThick-billed Murres.

 

Duck numbers estimated from ground counts, moss map data, and aerial videoCowardin, L.M.; Arnold, P.M.; Shaffer, T.L.; Pywell, H.R.; Miller, L.D.Pages 205-219 in Proc. 5th Natl. Moss Users Workshop. LA. Sea Grant Coll. Program, Baton Rouge and U.S. Fish andWildl. Serv., Slidell, LA. 1988. Reprint: 0734 AVAILABILITY: Available

ABSTRACT: We describe the use of remotely sensed data on pond abundance and availability of upland habitats, in conjunction with ground counts of breeding ducks, to estimate pond conditions, breeding populations, and Sample areas were mapped from aerial photographs and MOSS files were prepared. Aerial video data were obtained for the same areas and entered into a microcomputer by custom software. Models were developed to estimate breeding populations and recruitment for five species of ducks. The estimates compared favorably with estimates. A combination of detailed MOSS base maps, aerial video data, and ground census data holds promise as the basis for an efficient operational system for waterfowl managers.

 

Duck mortality caused by wind Kantrud, H.A. Prairie Nat. 3(1):32. 1971. Reprint:0366

 

Environmental influences of oil and gas development in the Arctic Slope and Beaufort SeaBrooks, J.W.; Bartonek, J.C.; Klein, D.R.; Spencer, D.L.; Thayer, A.S. U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv. Resour. Publ. 96. 24 pp. 1971. Reprint: 0077

ABSTRACT: This report describes the environmental characteristics andrenewable resources of the Arctic Slope and the Beaufort Sea in relation to oil and gas development. Problems associatedwith industrial activities are identified, and recommendations for avoiding or minimizing environmental and resource damage are advanced. It is noted that the simplicity of the ecosystems, the slow rate of organic processes, and the presence of permafrost create unique problems in connection with pollution, waste disposal, restoration of vegetation, and all activities which disturb the vegetated surface. In the Beaufort Sea, the shallowness of the continental shelf and the presence of pack ice represent serious physical obstacles to oil development and transportation and heighten the probability of potentially harmful accidents. The risk of serious environmental and resource damage in the Arctic will be greatly lessened by the imposition of high operational and safety standards. There is need for strengthening legal authority to promulgate essential regulations. As an interim substitute, close and effective cooperation between Government and industry must be developed. Both Government and industry have an obligation to support research aimed at providing an adequate understanding of numerous environmental and technical questions.

 

The year ducks nested into autumnKrapu, G.L. N.D. Outdoors 57(2):22-23. 1994. 0908

 

Distribution and status of marine birds breeding along the coasts of the Chukchi and Bering seas Bartonek, J.C.; Sealy, S.G. Pages 21-31 in J. C. Bartonek and D. N. Nettleship, eds. Conservation of marine birds of northern North America. U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv. Wildl. Res. Rep. 11. 319 pp. 1979. 0454

ABSTRACT: The Alaska coast fronting on the Chukchi and Bering seas, exclusive of the Aleutian Islands, supports seven complexes of marine bird colonies numbering more than 1 million birds each, nine colonies of 100,000 to almost 1 million birds, and many smaller colonies. Colonies are found on most headlands and islands and are dominated numerically by alcids and kittiwakes (Rissa sp.). Estuarine habitats (mainly the lowlands of northern Seward Peninsula, Yukon-Kuskokwim delta, and the north side of the Alaska Peninsula) are extremely important for breeding and migrating marine waterfowl, shorebirds, gulls (Larus sp.), and terns (Sterna sp.). Information on population size and distribution of breeding marine birds within this area is extensive for only a few of the more heavily hunted species of waterfowl. Except for the intensive and systematic censusing of a few colonies in this region, population data on cliff-, burrow-, and crevice-nesting birds are such that all but gross changes in numbers may go unnoticed, and if noticed they could not be measured.


Alaska Wild Animal Recovery Effort
Box 170, Homer, AK 99603
907-235-3877 (FAX) 907-235-5330
E-mail: bear@alaska.net